What will you do for Work when AI and Robots Take Over?

As Artificial Intelligence and robots continue to become more crucial in the workplace, employees face a daunting challenge of figuring how to cope with the significant changes that will most definitely accompany automation. Automation is no longer a fairy tale or some impossible dream, it’s happening faster than you think. So it’s critical to prepare yourself for the immense changes that are sure to occur. Interestingly, researchers from McKinsey estimate that more than 45% of current jobs can be automated. There is an urgent need for employees to start preparing themselves for the inevitable future of AI and Robots. AI and Robots will be significant in everyone’s future job.  Unfortunately, several organizations today are not prepared for such a significant transition. In fact, advanced data analytics and digitization has already brought about a significant gap between the skills people have and skills required by organizations. This gap in skills will not even compare to the substantial changes that automation will bring about. Although, no one can accurately predict what will happen in the future, however there are a specific changes that is expected to take place. Here are just a few.

Workers will be displaced: According to data from McKinsey, some jobs will experience significant decline by 2030. While some workers will be displaced. It is estimated that about 15 percent of the global workforce or about 400 million workers could be displaced by automation by 2030. Based on this estimates, the figure could potentially rise to about 30 percent, or 800 million workers. In our slowest adoption scenario, only about 10 million people would be displaced, close to zero percent of the global workforce

More Jobs would be created. At the same time, more jobs will be gained. As workers are displaced, there will be concurrent increase in demand for work. It is projected that there will be an income growth and increased investment in energy, infrastructure, deployment and technology development. These could translate to about an additional labor demand rising to 33 percent of the global workforce (890 million jobs). This will no doubt compensate for the number of workers displaced. If history is to be relied on, technology has always been a net job creator. So many jobs that we cannot imagine will be created. Think about the introduction of personal computer in the 1970s and 1980s. This invention lead to the creation of several jobs not just for software and app developers but for semiconductor makers, information analysts, customer-service representatives etc.

Jobs will experience significant changes. As jobs are lost or created, more will be changed as automation becomes more prevalent. As machines complement human labor expect to see some changes in the workplace. For example, some jobs that requires repetitive tasks could shift to a model that manages and troubleshoot automated systems. Amazon is already adopting automation as employees that previously haul and stacked objects are now trained to operate robots, monitoring the automated arms and resolving issues that interrupts the process. In the healthcare sector, AI algorithms that can accurately read diagnostic scans will help doctors with diagnosis and identify suitable treatment. Regardless of the industry, virtually all occupations will be somewhat affected by automation, but it has been estimated that only about 5 percent of the current occupations could be fully automated by currently demonstrated technologies. It is expected that as workers learn to work with rapidly evolving machines, the nature of most of the occupations will experience significant changes.

KEY WORKFORCE TRANSITIONS AND CHALLENGES

Although it is expected that there will be enough work to ensure full employment in the coming decades based on recent estimates, still there will be significant transition as automation becomes fully adopted. There will be changes in most occupations and these changes will be accompanied with new skills and educational requirements. The scope will be redesigned to ensure a smooth integration between humans and machines. Workers will need a set of new skills to thrive in the workplace of the future. Automation will bring about an accelerated shift in skills required in the workplace. There will be increased demand for advanced technological skills such as programming and coding as well as a greater need for cognitive skills such as critical thinking, creativity and complex information processing. Basic digital skills has been in increased demand and this trend is expected to continue in the future. It is predicted that the demand for manual and physical skills will experience significant decline, but will still remain the largest employer for labor in several countries. There will be additional pressure on the already existing workforce-skills challenge, as such it’s imperative for employees to start preparing themselves for this enormous changes. Displaced workers will probably have the opportunity to get retrained and utilize their skillset elsewhere. These individuals could potentially re-skill or build on their existing skills and find work in a different occupation. Even for employees that are not at risk for being displaced should strive to expand their skills.

It is common to people to switch between jobs today, so that could be an avenue for individuals to expand their skillsets. Employees should prepare themselves by taking advantage of online courses, industry seminars and community college classes to expand their skills and even get relevant certifications in new areas. Interestingly several companies are already providing re-skilling and training for their employees. It is recommended that more companies and governments parastatals do the same in a bid to address the challenges that will be brought about by automation.  Rather than seeking to roll back the adoption of automation, focus should be on seeking practical ways to ensure that the workforce transitions are as smooth as possible. These can be achieved through a number of ways. For instance, policy makers working with education providers and employers could seek out practical ways to improve basic STEM skills. This could be achieve through school systems and on-the-job training. Emphasis should be placed on critical and system thinking, creativity and adaptive and life-long learning. There should be significant investment in Human capital – investing in worker training is critical if this is to be accomplished. Policy makers through tax benefits and other incentives can encourage organizations to invest in their employees. This will include providing on the job training, capacity building and wage growth.

THE FUTURE OF WORK CHALLENGE

Work in the future will be different, require new skillset and a far greater adaptability that the workforce has never seen. Training and re-skilling both midcareer workers and new generations to prepare for these future challenges will be an imperative. The future with robots and AI will be challenging, but it will be a much richer one if we harness the technologies with aplomb—and work hard to mitigate the negative effects. More is involved than just focusing on re-training and re-skillinginstead employers should focus on lifelong employability. These involves continually helping employees to successfully adapt as the economy evolves. This will ensure employees remain employable and relevant and at the same time employers have the continuous presence of skilled workers they need in an organization.

REFERENCES

https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-work/competitive-advantage-with-a-human-dimensi…

 

https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-work/globalization-robots-and-universal-basic-i…

 

https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-work/how-google-dot-org-is-helping-workers-prep…

 

https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/artificial-intelligence/the-promise-and-challenge-of-the-…

 

 

Christopher is the Chief Value Officer and Founder of Change My Life Coaching and Co-Founder of Change My Business Coaching and the Healthy Transformations Weight Loss & Inflammation Reduction Program.  Change my Life Coaching is a fast growing whole-life, leadership and business coaching company, and the only one of it’s kind.  He is also the author of “Go Beyond Passion: Discover Your Dream Job”. Christopher spent 15+ years working in the corporate world with a plethora of industries and companies. His focus was primarily in planning, strategy, and leadership of change management and communication. Christopher is a Certified Master Coach Practitioner (CMCP), trainer and facilitator, and a passionate public speaker who truly cares about the success of each and every single person he comes into contact with. You can reach him at Christopher@ChangeMyLifeCoaching.ca.

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[VIDEO] The Best Video Interviewing Tips: Part 5 Tips For You

Check out this great video on interviewing. This is part 5 in a five part series.

https://youtu.be/3KEpNycNTeQ

Check out the transcript below!

Karmal – In an interview itself, you can’t have loads of paper in front of you, but on a video interview, you can.

Christopher – What tips would you give to people who might have to go out and do an interview? What are the one, two, or three key things that’s, like, if I was to do this again, here’s exactly what I would differently and here’s what I would tell people out in the internet world?

Karmal – I think what I missed a lot with the company that I was working for, sorry, that I was interviewing for, not working for, I should’ve gone a bit more to their website and put down a bit more of their keywords off their website because I was going through and answering,

and often in an interview, I’ve done some research because you’re in front of people, so I missed out on that on this one because I wasn’t thinking about the types of questions they were gonna ask. I was thinking more about, oh my goodness, it’s a video, I’ve not done this before.

Christopher – I guess the tip is, for that tip, it’s don’t get overwhelmed–

Karmal – Right.

Christopher – But the fact that it’s a video interview–

Karmal – Right.

Christopher – Do everything that you would normally do for an interview and then also focus on

the technicalities of doing a

Karmal – That’s right, and take advantage of the fact that it is video and write a bunch of stuff

down because in an interview itself you can’t have loads of paper in front of you but on a video interview you can.

Christopher – Yes, yes.

Karmal – So there’s lot of stuff that I could have prepped ahead of time and had in front of me, just as keywords and little notes or whatever that was needed. 

Christopher – To show your competencies. Yeah, that’s right, yeah. What about the software itself? So advanced prep, and that kind of thing, but do you have a tip around kind of the software or, you know you said you were bouncing from screen to screen, I’m curious how you would have managed that?

Karmal -I think I would have probably propped my actual camera up a bit higher because it would have, the video, the stuff I needed to see was at the top of the screen. So if I had propped the camera up a bit, propped it up on some books or whatever, then it probably would’ve been a bit better that would have looked like I was looking at the camera a bit more when I was monitoring the time. And so the recording starts automatically, you can start it

beforehand but when you hit that ninety seconds that recording starts, so you really have to pay attention to your time countdowns and stuff on the screen.

Christopher – Yeah, thank you for that Karmal.

[VIDEO] The Best Video Interviewing Tips: Part 4 Likes / Dislikes

Check out this great video on interviewing. Be sure to check back next week for Part 5 of this five part series.

https://youtu.be/Hyo72g4DEPc

Check out the transcript below!

Christopher – When you’re in an interview with a person who’s asking questions and there’s rapport established and there’s a level of comfort, your answers are different or at least you respond differently than when you’re behind a video. From your own experience like, what did you like about the video interview?

Karmal – I liked it because you have the 90 seconds to think about things and write things down whereas in a face to face interview you can’t go excuse me for a minute or two, I just need to write some stuff down.

Christopher – Can you set a timer for 90 seconds, yeah.

Karmal – So it was good that I could think about things and jot some little notes down in between before I actually answered the question.

Christopher – What did you not like about it?

Karmal – I think it was the actual recording itself, the fact that you couldn’t play it back and there was no way to rerecord or see even if you didn’t, how you couldn’t rerecord it, at least you could see it back.

Christopher – Which would be very true of a real interview ’cause once you say it, you say it.

Karmal – That’s right.

Christopher – It’s interesting though because I do think that there is a difference between when you’re in an interview with a person who’s asking questions and there’s rapport established and there’s a level of comfort, your answers are different or at least you respond differently than when you’re behind a video like the reason why I’m sitting beside you today instead of doing just me, like and why I often don’t like to do videos by myself is because I perform differently if it’s not just a conversation. Like this feels natural and so what I’m saying is more authentic.

Karmal – Right.

Christopher – But when I’m in front of a video, it feels scripted and I’m afraid I’m gonna forget things and this kind of thing so I’m wondering if that was kind of your–

Karmal – It was and you know, in my head I’m going look at the camera, look at the camera right so and you’re trying to stay centered and also in an interview process you can see their kinda facial expressions if  they don’t like your answer then you can kind of switch part way through and–

Christopher – Yeah how can you tell ’cause your camera lens, this is a really good point. Your camera lens would be the eye contact that they might be looking for and so I think jeez what

a disadvantage maybe because if you’re not used to looking– At a camera. Right into the lens like even now I wonder how we’re doing because that’s the lens right there you know but it’s like I probably looked all over the device and looked out at the window here because there’s nobody in front of us. So what didn’t you like about?

Karmal – I’d say that the biggest thing is, again you don’t get any feedback in that way so that was the biggest downfall for me not being able to get that feedback as your– Just through body language. So you’re hoping that you’re answering the questions to the best of your ability and getting everything in that you need to get in. And there’s the time limit right? When you’re in an interview it takes you five to seven minutes to answer a question because you’ve lots to

say then that’s okay.

Christopher – Yup.

Karmal – Should’ve gone a bit more to their website and put down a bit more of their keywords off their website.

[VIDEO] The Best Video Interviewing Tips: Part 3 Starting The Interview / Lessons Learned

Check out this great video on interviewing. Be sure to check back next week for part 4 of this five part series.

https://youtu.be/SNSCsCoaFHQ

Check out the transcript below!

Christopher – What would’ve happened if you, like, had a sneezing fit or something? 

Karmal – It would’ve got recorded. 

Christopher – So then you went and you clicked the link and you did the interview–

Karmal – I did the interview.

Christopher – So I’m curious, how did you, let’s step back for a second here. Because the things that I would be thinking about if I’m doing an interview. So you did this at home–

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – It wasn’t in their space–

Karmal – No.

Christopher – This was in your home. Great idea for the employer in so many senses. But I think some people they get a bit nervous in front of video whereas if they’re in front of somebody, they would perform differently. Like, I’m awkward in front of video lots of times but when I’m in front of people I’m way more natural. 

Karmal – And for me, because you’re not face-to-face, you’re not reading body language and facial expressions on a video, and you don’t get to replay, once you’re in the real interview there’s no replay or re-recording, it is what it is, so you don’t even get to see how you performed or what it was like.

Christopher – How long did you get to answer each question?

Karmal – It was anywhere from, so, the question would come out printed, you got 90 seconds to think about it, where I scribbled furiously, and then it was between two and three minutes for the recording, depending on the question.

Christopher – Wow, yeah, between two and three minutes. So, what would have happened if you, like, had a sneezing fit or something?

Karmal – It would have got recorded. And I went over on one question. I’m talking away and I wasn’t paying attention to the time and I went 30 seconds into the next question’s 90 second

think about things in between. So they whole missed the last 30 seconds of my– (laughs)

Christopher – Oh my gosh. So it sounds like you had to pay attention to a lot of moving parts

while you were doing this. It’s almost like a test eh.

Karmal – It is.

Christopher – Whereas you go in, read the question, and then the timer starts.

Karmal – And I imagine I looked a little frenetic ’cause I had a surface tablet but then I have two big monitors, so the surface tablet’s down here where my camera is, my two monitors are up here, my paper’s over here. So I’m looking here, I’m looking at the timer, I’m looking at the camera, I’m looking at my paper, I’m looking at the camera, I’m looking at the timer. So I was probably just bouncing all over the place in the video.

Christopher – Interesting, yeah. Great learning experience–

Karmal – It was.

Christopher – And we’re hoping that you guys are taking something from this. Your answers are different, or at least you respond differently, than when you’re behind a video.

[VIDEO] The Best Video Interviewing Tips: Part 2 Prepping for The Interview

Check out this great video on interviewing. Be sure to check back next week for Part 3 of this five part series.

https://youtu.be/bWRu3f3B1Z0

Check out the transcript below!

Karmal – So, I decided to go with something a bit more colorful.

Christopher – I know for me, I would have looked at, what was I wearing?

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – What was behind me?

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – So, what did you wear? And, what did you put behind you?

Karmal – So, I decided to go with something a bit more colorful. Now unfortunately, my office at my house is in our spare bedroom, which has really bright pink walls. So, I tried to set the video so that the pink walls were down at the bottom. I couldn’t get rid of them entirely, ’cause they come halfway up. But, so they were a little bit behind me, but I just tried. And, they have a cutout where the head and the shoulders are. And, my head was really small, and my shoulders were really big. 

Christopher – Oh, wow!

Karmal – Yeah, so it was hard to get. And, I was trying to keep centered in there, so I wasn’t off-centered. So yeah, it was quite the process.

Christopher – That’s interesting.

Karmal – And, you don’t get to replay one you’re in the real interview. There’s no replay or re-recording. 

[VIDEO] The Best Video Interviewing Tips: Part 1 The Initial Experience

Check out this great video on interviewing. Be sure to check back next week for Part 2 of this five part series.

 
https://youtu.be/bZ4WTKd-Um8

Check out the transcript below!

Christopher – The job search process is, in my opinion in terms of a first world, we’re very privileged to live where we live.

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – It’s kind of an inhumane process, like there’s–

Karmal – It really is.

Christoper – Hi everybody, this is Christopher Lawrence with Change My Life Coaching, and I am here with a friend and colleague, Karmal Beninger. Karmal and I went to college together. So actually, Karmal is here with me today because she had to do her very first video interview for a job. So, Karmal is a job-searcher right now, and there is a trend moving forward now with doing video interviews, and so there’s all sorts of different things. So, I wanna help our followers understand how you could do this by using Karmal’s experience. So Karmal, can you tell us just a little bit about the process? So you applied for a position.

Karmal – Yep.

Christopher – And then what happened?

Karmal – So I received a call from the HR department at the company, and they said that they

were doing rather than a phone interview that many of the companies are doing, they’re actually doing video interviews. So they’re prerecorded video interviews, not a live face-to-face interview, and they gave you a few days to do the interview and gave you a deadline of when it could be completed.

Christopher – So they sent you an email back?

Karmal – That’s right, with the software that you needed to work with and–

Christopher – So you had to download a software?

Karmal – It was just online, so you just clicked a link and it loaded itself, yeah.

Christopher – Okay, yeah. And did you even get a phone call from them to tell you, or it was just the video?

Karmal – Just the phone call saying that I was had been selected for going forward and that the next step would be the video interview.

Christopher – Interesting. So then, tell us how you did this. You scheduled a time for yourself,

or did you just click on it and go, or?

Karmal – So I figured I’d give myself a couple days to figure it out on my own ’cause I’ve not ever done a video-anything before. So, I figured I’d give myself a couple days, do a bit of research. They give you a practice interview

Christopher – Oh.

Karmal – So you can go in and you can practice and everything ahead of time. And then they give you, I think it was three pre-interview questions that you can practice as many times as you want. So I went through those a couple of times over the couple of days, and then I made sure that I had everything done the day before that the deadline was.

Christopher – Wow okay.

Karmal – Yeah.

Christopher – One of the things that I’ve often observed doing career coaching, and what I’ve seen happening over the last two decades, or certainly the last decade, I think it’s gone on for a long time, but in the past, it’s like a job interview is done over a lunch. You’d go in, you’d shake hands, if you submitted a resume, you would hear from them at least with something. Now, I mean, somebody posts a job up and you’re getting hundreds of applicants within hours. Organizations as a matter of process have had to streamline these systems–

Karmal – Absolutely.

Christopher – To save costs and money. In doing so, they’ve actually made the application and interview process, the job search process, is in my opinion, in terms of a first-world, we’re very privileged to live where we live. 

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – It’s kind of an inhumane process, like there’s–

Karmal – It really is.

Christopher – There’s less and less and less human contact like this. You can’t go in and submit

resumes in person anymore, and so these people who are able to establish a relationship and this is the thing.

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – We know that it’s all about relationships, but if you can’t go in and do that, which kind of lends credibility to go do some networking.

Karmal – That’s right.

Christopher – You know, even networking, I mean people are, there’s a lot of skepticism now around what does this person want from me?

Karmal – Right.

Christopher – It’s not the way it used to be.

Karmal – No.

Christopher – Where you could pick up the phone and say I wanna job with you.

Karmal – That’s right.

Christopher – So tell me what it’s gonna take to get there. It’s like look at our website, follow our online system, and now, you don’t even get a phone interview, right?

Karmal – No, that’s right.

Christopher – Yeah. So, I know for me, I would’ve looked at like what was I wearing?

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – What was behind me?

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – So what did you wear and

what did you put behind you?

Karmel – So I decided…

Christopher – The job search process is, in my opinion in terms of a first world, we’re very privileged to live where we live.

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – It’s kind of an inhumane process, like there’s–

Karmal – It really is.

Christoper – Hi everybody, this is Christopher Lawrence with Change My Life Coaching, and I am here with a friend and colleague, Karmal Beninger. Karmal and I went to college together. So actually, Karmal is here with me today because she had to do her very first video interview for a job. So, Karmal is a job-searcher right now, and there is a trend moving forward now with doing video interviews, and so there’s all sorts of different things. So, I wanna help our followers understand how you could do this by using Karmal’s experience. So Karmal, can you tell us just a little bit about the process? So you applied for a position.

Karmal – Yep.

Christopher – And then what happened?

Karmal – So I received a call from the HR department at the company, and they said that they

were doing rather than a phone interview that many of the companies are doing, they’re actually doing video interviews. So they’re prerecorded video interviews, not a live face-to-face interview, and they gave you a few days to do the interview and gave you a deadline of when it could be completed.

Christopher – So they sent you an email back?

Karmal – That’s right, with the software that you needed to work with and–

Christopher – So you had to download a software?

Karmal – It was just online, so you just clicked a link and it loaded itself, yeah.

Christopher – Okay, yeah. And did you even get a phone call from them to tell you, or it was just the video?

Karmal – Just the phone call saying that I was had been selected for going forward and that the next step would be the video interview.

Christopher – Interesting. So then, tell us how you did this. You scheduled a time for yourself,

or did you just click on it and go, or?

Karmal – So I figured I’d give myself a couple days to figure it out on my own ’cause I’ve not ever done a video-anything before. So, I figured I’d give myself a couple days, do a bit of research. They give you a practice interview

Christopher – Oh.

Karmal – So you can go in and you can practice and everything ahead of time. And then they give you, I think it was three pre-interview questions that you can practice as many times as you want. So I went through those a couple of times over the couple of days, and then I made sure that I had everything done the day before that the deadline was.

Christopher – Wow okay.

Karmal – Yeah.

Christopher – One of the things that I’ve often observed doing career coaching, and what I’ve seen happening over the last two decades, or certainly the last decade, I think it’s gone on for a long time, but in the past, it’s like a job interview is done over a lunch. You’d go in, you’d shake hands, if you submitted a resume, you would hear from them at least with something. Now, I mean, somebody posts a job up and you’re getting hundreds of applicants within hours. Organizations as a matter of process have had to streamline these systems–

Karmal – Absolutely.

Christopher – To save costs and money. In doing so, they’ve actually made the application and interview process, the job search process, is in my opinion, in terms of a first-world, we’re very privileged to live where we live. 

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – It’s kind of an inhumane process, like there’s–

Karmal – It really is.

Christopher – There’s less and less and less human contact like this. You can’t go in and submit

resumes in person anymore, and so these people who are able to establish a relationship and this is the thing.

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – We know that it’s all about relationships, but if you can’t go in and do that, which kind of lends credibility to go do some networking.

Karmal – That’s right.

Christopher – You know, even networking, I mean people are, there’s a lot of skepticism now around what does this person want from me?

Karmal – Right.

Christopher – It’s not the way it used to be.

Karmal – No.

Christopher – Where you could pick up the phone and say I wanna job with you.

Karmal – That’s right.

Christopher – So tell me what it’s gonna take to get there. It’s like look at our website, follow our online system, and now, you don’t even get a phone interview, right?

Karmal – No, that’s right.

Christopher – Yeah. So, I know for me, I would’ve looked at like what was I wearing?

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – What was behind me?

Karmal – Yes.

Christopher – So what did you wear and

what did you put behind you?

Karmel – So I decided…

[VIDEO] Do You Have a Fulfilling Career or a Good Job?

Do you have a “fulfilling career” or a “good job”? Transcription Christopher Lawrence here with Change My Life Coaching. I often get asked the question, what makes a fulfilling career? Sometimes when clients come in they bring in a Venn diagram that’s made up of three circles, usually, right? The Venn diagram says, you have to have a job that contains skills that you’re good at, and it says that you must have a job … Read more